5 Myths and Facts About Vitamin C (“overrated vitamin but good defense”)

Everything you need to know about this essential nutrient.

While some research shows that people who regularly take vitamin C supplements may have slightly shorter colds or somewhat milder symptoms, for most people, boosting vitamin C doesn’t reduce the risk of catching the common cold. I say “most people” because there are studies that show that vitamin C cut cold risk by 50% in male athletes, but not in females.

It is true that vitamin C is critical for immune function, and that it plays a key role in wound healing. But the best way to keep your immune system strong is to eat healthfully, including vitamin C rich produce, all the time. Unfortunately, the latest stats show that three-quarters of Americans fall short of the recommended minimum two daily cups of fruit and 87% fail to eat the advised three daily cups of veggies. Fill that gap and you’ll easily take in at least 200 mg of vitamin C daily, enough to keep your immune system well supported every day so you won’t need to play catch up.

Vitamin C deficiencies are rare: fact

Our bodies cannot produce vitamin C, which is what makes this nutrient essential, meaning we must obtain it from food. But these days a deficiency serious enough to cause symptoms, which can include bleeding gums and nosebleeds, swollen joints, rough, dry skin, and bruising, is pretty rare.

Citrus is the best source of vitamin C: myth

While citrus is an excellent source of vitamin C, a veggie—bell peppers—comes out on top. One cup of chopped raw red bell pepper (about the size of a tennis ball) packs 200-300 mg of vitamin C, about 100 more than a cup of OJ. Other good sources include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kiwi, strawberries, papaya, pineapple, and cantaloupe, as well as (of course) citrus fruits, like oranges, tangerines, and grapefruit.

Adequate vitamin C intake helps weight loss: fact (mostly)

A low blood level of vitamin C has been linked to having a higher BMI, body fat percentage, and waist circumference, compared to people with normal levels. And a study from Arizona State University found that vitamin C status might affect the body’s ability to use fat as a fuel source—during both exercise and at rest.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: news.health.com